Home

  • Top Stories

THE DAILY TOUT View all

0
The Daily Tout

With the advent of easy, high quality phone technology combined with the widespread use of restaurant review sites, photo-centric social media platforms and the groundswell of everything local, hyper-local and farm to fork, sharing a shot of what’s on the plate is everyone’s new hobby.  Everyone’s mega-pixels are trained on…More

0
The Daily Tout

Editor’s Note: We first met Ayesha Curry in 2014 when she was Interviewed at our Sonoma, Ca. offices. We knew then she was a star. And now her star is skyrocketing. Ayesha currently hosts a new Food Network Show and just celebrated her first cookbook. By Johanna Rupp with Tracy…More

0
Artisan Purveyors

When you do an internet query for “cat”, up pops a variety of cat memes, scenes and videos of cats doing cat things. Cats hopping in and out of boxes and bags, cats playing pianos, cats riding Roombas. You’ll even find a cat that is now a handbag. True story.…More

0
Featured Product

Grandma’s classic recipes are hip again, especially this quicker-brittle that goes from bubbling-in-the pot to spreading-in-the-pan in less than 30 minutes. While she may have had to stand and stir til the cows came home when she cooked-up the traditional recipe, but when the lion’s share of the work has been…More

ARTISAN PURVEYORS View all

0
Artisan Purveyors

When you do an internet query for “cat”, up pops a variety of cat memes, scenes and videos of cats doing cat things. Cats hopping in and out of boxes and bags, cats playing pianos, cats riding Roombas. You’ll even find a cat that is now a handbag. True story.…More

0
Artisan Purveyors

Joe and Minnie Ransom’s BBQ and catering business began as many family food enterprises do. “Papa Joe” used to BBQ for the family (and many, many friends) and eventually ended up getting wrangled into doing it at work for special events or employee appreciation days. During pre-retirement time, it was…More

0
Artisan Purveyors

Mealtime around a firehouse table is generally a communally boisterous and often, dare it be said, a braggadocious affair with plenty of good-natured chiding and throwing down of gauntlets. Chili cook-offs are de rigeur for engine companies from Terre Haute to Topeka and winning rib recipe titles are fiercely defended…More

AWESOME PRODUCTS View all

0
Artisan Purveyors

Joe and Minnie Ransom’s BBQ and catering business began as many family food enterprises do. “Papa Joe” used to BBQ for the family (and many, many friends) and eventually ended up getting wrangled into doing it at work for special events or employee appreciation days. During pre-retirement time, it was…More

0
Artisan Purveyors

Mealtime around a firehouse table is generally a communally boisterous and often, dare it be said, a braggadocious affair with plenty of good-natured chiding and throwing down of gauntlets. Chili cook-offs are de rigeur for engine companies from Terre Haute to Topeka and winning rib recipe titles are fiercely defended…More

0
Awesome Products

For Steve Fortuna, staying sane while navigating bear and bull markets in the world of high finance was all thanks to his passion for gardening. A few years ago while tending to his garden in the Berkshires, Steve had a refreshing epiphany. “The inspiration was simple,” Steve said. “Imagine if…More

  • Roost Questionnaire
  • FEATURED PRODUCT
    New England Lobster Market Eatery. Try our new gourmet seafood sauces. 824 Cowan Rd. Burlingame, CA. 650-443-1559. www.newenglandlobster.net
  • THE BIZ REPORT
  • Taste Tout Shout Facebook Live with Dawn from Tess' Kitchen

    Today on Taste Tout Shout | Facebook Live we chatted with Dawn Empson of Tess’ Kitchen Store about whatever came to wine.

    Play video

    A hip Fall take on Grandma's Brittle

    Everyone loves an easy take on a classic sweet, don’t they? If you love the tasty mix of sweet, easy, toasty, crunchy and just a little salty, this is totally the recipe for you. Grandma may have had to stand and stir til the cows came home when she cooked-up the traditional peanut brittle recipe, but when the lion’s share of the work has been done for you, it’s just a hop and a skip from the pot to the pan.

     

     

    Play video

    How to Make Fried Cheese

    A quick and easy trick to transform simple cheese into a satisfying snack.

    Play video

    Tricky Dick’s Stuffed Burgers

    A burger stuffed with tasty secrets, loved by Presidents and civilians alike.

    Play video

    September's Taste Tout Trilogy celebrates Italian hearth, home and tiramisu

    Italian meals are as reliable as a Volvo when it comes to delivering big flavor with little time or money investment.

    Play video

    Easy Monte Cristo

    A lighter take on the diner classic that expertly blends sweet and savory.

    Play video

    Food for Thought: Apples

    There is perhaps no other fruit that’s left a mark on human popular culture quite like the apple.

    

    Arroz con pollo brings a taste of latin flavored hearth and home to dinner time

    It’s easy, colorful and one of the most satisfying one-pot meals you can toss together in less than an hour.

    Play video

    Start your mornings with a sturdy and strong hit of Cuban coffee

    With trade embargo’s loosening with the island nation off the coast of Miami, we’ll soon start seeing Cuban coffee brands flooding the aisles next to Folgers, Dunkin’ Donuts and the ubiquitous Starbucks. Cuban style coffee is huge in Miami, and in many coffee houses, sugar is still whipped by hand by barristas as strong as the drinks they brew. The best part of this drink is you don’t need any special machinery, just some strong black coffee, a little sugar and lots of elbow grease.

    Cafe Cubano

    Ingredients:

    1/2 cup strong black coffee

    2 tablespoons sugar

    Directions:

    1. Brew strong coffee. If you have a stovetop “espresso” machine, feel free to use it. Or you can use real espresso. Or just a strong cup of black coffee. All work great.

    2. Place sugar in a small bowl. Add 1 tsp of black coffee to the mixture and whip.

    3. Whip the sugar and coffee until it is sandy and pale. It should be golden in color and as thick as heavy cream.

    4. Slowly pour in the rest of the coffee in and mix until combined.

    5. Pour into espresso cups. Allow foam to rise before serving.

    The instant noodle conundrum

    I’ve recently lost my appetite.

    It happens every now and then, a couple times a year when I just can’t stand looking at real food. To subsist, I graze one seeds, fruit and the occasional bag of SmartPop while guzzling diet soda like a soccer mom.

    It doesn’t last too long though. Before I know it, I’m back to making carbonara and creme puffs, and turning on my Vitamix as often as I turn on my car. This time, my culinary malaise just won’t go away.

    I haven’t stepped into my kitchen and honed my knives in quite some time. My dishwasher contains no pans with caked on sauces or demi-glace. I opened my fridge for a glass of milk and could have sworn I saw a few cobwebs. And if there’s a culprit, it’s one packed in a styrofoam cup.

    Instant noodles that are unwrapped, filled with hot water, allowed to sit and then slurped down has been a daily occurrence now, and I don’t see it stopping anytime soon. Somehow, someway, every time I pop open a lid and pour in the hot water (after picking out the dried shrimp and enjoying them as a sort of appetizer) an act of pavlovian horror happens.

    For those unfamiliar with the Japanese miracle invention known as the cup noodle, I hate to reveal the proverbial wizard behind the curtain but the secret ingredient is salt. Salt, modified salt, a weird salt that keeps the pre-fried noodles yellow and then to top it off, a hint of salt.

    Normally I scoff at the excess amounts of salt found in all things packaged. I always get low sodium stocks. I shake off the excess salt in a bag of Lays chip by chip. I can’t even look at a box of Hamburger Helper.

    But whether it’s lunch time or cooling down after a day at work, there’s only one thing I reach for.

    Shrimp Maruchan Cup Noodle. If I’m feeling particularly Julia Child, I squeeze in half a lime and add a few hits of Tapatio.

    I used to balance both worlds. I used to doctor Ramen noodles with homemade broths or sauces. Occasionally, I ate them dry with their seasoning packet. Vary rarely did I ever just follow the instructions on the lid.

    At this point, I’m not sure whether I should embrace it or not. The mystery going forward will be if the malaise will end, or become a full blown addiction.

    And at fifty cents a pop, an incredibly sustainable one.